@WashULaw Blog


Legal English: “Writ”

A “writ” is a fairly archaic term for an official order issued by a governmental authority, most commonly a court. Two familiar types of writs are warrants (for the arrest of an individual) and subpoenas (used in civil proceedings and business litigation to order the production of documents)...

Legal English: “Gag Order”

A “gag order” is an order that prevents disclosure of information. It can be directed at an individual or an organization, and can be issued by a court or other governmental authority, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or National Security Agency...

Washington University School of Law News and Events

Washington University School of Law will host the International Law Weekend – Midwest Regional conference Sept. 19-21.

Case Study: Moncrieffe v. Holder

In Moncrieffe v. Holder, Attorney General, Docket No. 11-702 (Opinion entered April 23, 2013), the Supreme Court addressed the issue of mandatory deportation for noncitizens convicted of “aggravated felonies.” In this case...

Top Law Firm: Clifford Chance

Clifford Chance, headquartered in London, is one of the top international law firms in the world. The firm serves clients throughout the world with 35 branch offices located in 25 countries, including the United States, China, Australia, Brazil, France and Japan.

Legal English: “Magistrate Judge”

A “magistrate judge” is a judge generally tasked with handling more routine and or administrative judicial matters. The position exists at multiple levels of government (i.e. local, state, federal), and actual responsibilities can vary depending on jurisdiction. In many cases...