Dual LL.M. Degree With Tecnológico de Monterrey


Washington University School of Law has partnered with the Tecnológico de Monterrey’s Escuela de Gobierno y Transformación Pública (the Graduate School of Government and Public Transformation) to deliver a dual Master of Laws (LL.M.) program online.

Graduates from this program earn an LL.M. in U.S. Law from the top-20 ranked Washington University School of Law 1 and an LL.M. in Transnational Legal Practice from Tecnológico de Monterrey, ranked No. 2 in Mexico. 2

The dual degree is designed for non-U.S.-trained lawyers who want to build their knowledge of international law, including legal practice in the U.S. and Latin America, without having to put their careers or personal commitments on hold. The program features curricula from two top-ranked universities delivered through live, online classes taught by distinguished faculty.

A Curriculum With
an International Perspective

The dual degree is a 35-credit program and can typically be completed in two to three years (24–36 months) on a full-time or part-time basis. Students will complete 20 credits from the Washington University School of Law and 15 credits from Tecnológico de Monterrey.

Upon completion of the program, students will be eligible to take the bar exam in California and Washington state. All classes are taught in English. Explore the course catalog to learn more about each elective.

Program Requirements

  • 35
    total credits
  • 17
    elective credits including
    special topics courses
  • 2 – 3
    years to complete

Featured Courses

Through a combination of courses at Washington University School of Law and Tecnológico de Monterrey, students gain a fresh perspective on international laws and regulations.

Constitutional Law

Explore the nature of a constitution, the foundations of judicial power, the forms of judicial review, and the evolution of constitutionalism in different types of political systems.

Professional Responsibility

This course prepares students for the ethical dilemmas they will face in legal settings by examining the types of lawyer regulation, client-attorney relationships, confidentiality rules, conflicts of interest, and duties to courts.

International Business Transactions

Learn about the different types of contracts between individuals of different jurisdictions and gain the practical skills needed to write international contracts both in Spanish and English.

An On-Campus Immersion in the U.S.

Students can enhance their online learning experience by attending an optional immersion on the Washington University campus in St. Louis, Missouri. During the immersion, students complete a 1-credit elective course, network with classmates and faculty, and tour legal landmarks including a U.S. courthouse.

This immersion is an opportunity for our students to further understand the complexities of U.S. law and explore the U.S. during their stay.

Admissions

Dual LL.M. candidates must have an LL.B. or equivalent to apply. LSAT and GRE scores are not required. To apply, you must submit the following:

  • Statement of purpose
  • Résumé or CV
  • Official transcripts
  • Online interview

The dual LL.M. program has four start dates throughout the year. Applications are accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis. Below are upcoming start dates and application deadlines:

Dual LL.M. Dates and Deadlines
Program Start Date Priority Deadline Application Deadline
January 14, 2019 October 22, 2018 December 10, 2018
April 1, 2019 January 21, 2019 February 25, 2019
July 8, 2019 April 29, 2019 June 3, 2019
Find out how you can earn your dual LL.M. entirely
online and gain an international legal perspective.

“Online classes are a huge help because I don’t have to step out of my office to attend class. Even if I’m on a trip, I can log in to class and not fall behind”

— Alejandro Alvarez Diaz Torre, Dual Master of Laws

Class Profile

Coming from all over the world, our students bring a wealth of varied expertise and a range of unique perspectives to the program. The School of Law encourages all perspectives and promotes a collaborative learning environment.

  • 59%
    Female
  • 36
    Average Age

Top Fields of Employment

  • Corporate Law
  • Banking & Finance
  • Commercial Law
  • Antitrust Law
  • Immigration Law
  • Real Estate

Country of Origin

This information reflects data collected from online dual LL.M. students in the October 2016 to January 2018 cohorts with a 100% response rate. Map shows percentage breakdown of country of origin. 23% are from the U.S., 35% are from Mexico, 12% are from Brazil, 12% are from Columbia, 6% are from Poland, 6% are from Kenya, and 6% are from Kazakhstan.

Who Should Earn a Dual LL.M.?

Professionals who are pursuing a career in international law or who need a foundation in U.S. law to work with U.S.-based clients can benefit from earning a dual LL.M. The program will help these professionals practice U.S. law and facilitate international negotiations in an increasingly global legal landscape.

Students should pursue the dual LL.M. if they are interested in:

Practicing in the United States:

Create a shorter path to becoming a practicing attorney in the United States than a traditional three-year JD program.

Working at international firms:

Developing a solid understanding of U.S. and international law can improve communication with clients at international firms.

Practicing at home:

Understanding the complexities of two countries’ legal systems and law on a global scale can help bring new ideas to a home practice.

Students should pursue the dual LL.M. if they are interested in:

Practicing in the United States:

Create a shorter path to becoming a practicing attorney in the United States than a traditional three-year JD program.

Working at international firms:

Developing a solid understanding of U.S. and international law can improve communication with clients at international firms.

Practicing at home:

Understanding the complexities of two countries’ legal systems and law on a global scale can help bring new ideas to a home practice.

Learn More About
Tecnológico de Monterrey

Tecnológico de Monterrey’s Escuela de Gobierno y Transformación Pública (the Graduate School of Government and Public Transformation) was named the second most prestigious university in Mexico in 2018. 3 It is fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), and it is a member of the European Consortium of Innovative Universities (ECIU).

Learn more about the university and read about the program in Spanish. If you have questions about the online LL.M. dual-degree program, contact our admissions team at 314.281.5200 or admissions@onlinelaw.wustl.edu.

Learn how a degree from Washington University School of Law and Tecnológico de Monterrey can benefit you and your international legal career.

1 www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/washington-university-in-st-louis-03092 (Accessed on Oct. 31, 2018) Return to footnote reference
2 www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/rankings-by-location/mexico/2019 (Accessed on Oct. 31, 2018) Return to footnote reference
3 www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/rankings-by-location/mexico/2019 (Accessed on Oct. 31, 2018) Return to footnote reference

Tecnológico de Monterrey is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award a master’s degree in Transnational Legal Practice from the School of Government and Public Transformation. Washington University School of Law is not accredited by SACS Commission on Colleges, and the accreditation of Tecnológico de Monterrey does not extend to or include Washington University School of Law or its students. Further, although Tecnológico de Monterrey agrees to accept certain course work from Washington University School of Law to be applied toward an award from Tecnológico de Monterrey, that course work may not be accepted by other colleges or universities in transfer, even if it appears on a transcript from Tecnológico de Monterrey. The decision to accept course work in transfer from any institution is made by the institution considering the acceptance of credits or course work.